Richard P. Curran

April 6, 2018

Richard P. Curran
U.S. Veteran

US Army

Korean War

RICHARD P. “Dick” CURRAN – of Woburn, April 6th, at the age of eighty-five. Beloved husband of the late Joan (Hooper) Curran. Loving father of Michael F. Curran, his wife Rosemary of NH, Richard Curran Jr., his wife Bonnie of Revere, John C. Curran, his wife Kelly Grammer-Curran of Woburn and Siobhan Curran, her husband Brian Butler of Woburn. Cherished “Da” of Shanen, Molly, Kevin, Joanie, Sinead, Jack, Maeve, Danielle, Michael and Krysta. Dear brother of Catherine Scalley of Woburn, and the late Thomas Curran and Mary Cullen. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. A Funeral will be held from the Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home, 263 Main Street, Thurs., April 12th, at 9 a.m. followed by his Funeral Mass in St. Charles Church, 280 Main Street at 10. Interment in Woodbrook Cemetery. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to call at the Funeral Home, Wed., 4-8 p.m. Remembrances may be made in Dick’s honor to the James L McKeown Boys & Girls Club of Woburn, Charles Gardner Lane, Woburn, MA 01801 or to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society 9 Erie Dr., Ste. 101, Natick, MA 01760.

WOBURN – Richard P. Curran of Central Square passed away just after the new day arrived on Friday April 6th. He had his family by his side after a long struggle with illness. He was blessed to live a long, full life of 85 years surrounded by family and friends that loved him.

Dick, as he was known, was born in Woburn and was the son of Michael and Mary (Roche) of Woburn. He came from a family with deep roots in Woburn and family committed to community service. His father, Mike, was a City Treasurer of Woburn and most notably the City Editor of the Woburn Daily Times for nearly 50 years. He instilled in Dick his love of community and broke him into the newspaper business during its golden age when he was just young boy. Dick would often tell stories of taking breaking stories into the Boston Post or Record American on the Train and delivering them to the heavy hitters of the day. As a young adult his father would send him as a stringer to cover local stories in Woburn and surrounding areas. He said, it was through these experiences that learned how government worked, but more importantly, how people worked.

Dick took the Train into Boston College High every day as boy and later drove into “the Heights” every day. He graduated from Boston College in 1953 with a degree in the classics and maintained a love for his alma mater until the day he passed. He instilled in his children a love of learning and believed the hallmark of success in education was the ability to “learn how to learn”. In fact, even during his struggle in the last two years, you would find him reading about his Irish ancestry or the latest theory on the origins of the universe. His daughter Siobhan often said of him, “he was a Renaissance Man” – he was open to new ideas and change, constantly growing right up until the day he died.

He enlisted in the Army as Medic in 1954 and was honorably discharged from the Army Reserves in 1962. After leaving the regular Army, Dick started his family with the great love of his life, Joan (Hooper) Curran. Together they raised four children that would become the single greatest joy and legacy of his life. His greatest hardship was the loss of his beloved wife Joanie at a young age. Upon her passing, he said to his four children, “marriage is not a 50/50 relationship, it is giving 100% when the other cannot carry the load”. Both Dick and Joan understood and experienced that life lesson and that is what made their relationship so special.

Dick, like his father before him, dedicated himself to community and service. He was deeply involved in the Leukemia Society of Greater Boston eventually becoming President of the Greater Boston Chapter. He was an integral part of establishing the “Five Hours for Life Telethon” on WCVB Channel 5 which raised hundreds of thousands dollars for the fight against Leukemia. He made sure his own children manned the phones so that they would also learn the importance of helping others.

He channeled his love of history into preservation of local history. He was member of the Woburn Historic Commission and served as chair in what many consider the hay day of the local commission. During this time the commission participated in many bicentennial events and built the Colonel Baldwin Canal Boat. The Baldwin Mansion was saved from demolition and large tracts of the canal were cleaned and restored. All the while, he involved his children in each of these endeavors establishing memories and lessons to last a lifetime.

Dick was a life-long member of the Democratic City Committee and participated in local politics throughout his life. He served as the Chair of the young democrats in his early years and was an integral part in each every one of his son John’s campaigns. He enjoyed a spirited debated and respected people’s right to have an opinion.

He was fortunate to share another love with his companion, Judy Golden. They were able to enjoy trips to Ireland and museums and just the pleasure of each other’s company. They shared a devotion over 20 years that greatly enriched their lives together.

Dick’s greatest joy was spending time with his family. In his later years he enjoyed his grandchildren, whether it was writing letters to his oldest grandchild or trying to keep the littlest one from trouble. He lived out his life in the house he loved at 2 Wyman Street and could be seen most days working in the yard or sitting on his porch where many people would stop by and swap stories with him. He lived here with his son, John, and daughter-in-law Kelly and two of his grandchildren Jack and Maeve and his sister Catherine. He continued to pass on the life lessons to them that he passed on to his own children. He looked forward to those moments when all of his children and family were together with him at his home to enjoy a holiday or a celebration.

Above all, most people that knew him will probably remember sitting in the kitchen at 2 Wyman Street listening to him tell a story or joke. He was a great story teller. The best part of watching him tell a story was not the lesson or the punch line – it was watching him tell the story. He was, as his daughter Siobhan said, an extraordinary ordinary man.

Dick is the Loving father of Michael F. Curran, his wife Rosemary of NH, Richard Curran Jr., his wife Bonnie of Revere, John C. Curran, his wife Kelly Grammer-Curran of Woburn and Siobhan Curran, her husband Brian Butler of Woburn. Cherished “Da” of Shanen, Molly, Kevin, Joanie, Sinead, Jack, Maeve, Danielle, Michael and Krysta. Dear brother of Catherine Scalley of Woburn, and the late Thomas Curran and Mary Cullen. He was the loving son of Michael J. and Mary V. (Roche) Curran. He is also survived by his brother-in-law Tom Hooper and his wife Ellen and his sister-in-law Peggy and her husband Dave as well as many loving nieces and nephews.

A Funeral will be held from the Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home, 263 Main Street, Thurs., April 12th, at 9 a.m. followed by his Funeral Mass in St. Charles Church, 280 Main Street at 10. Interment in Woodbrook Cemetery. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to call at the Funeral Home, Wed., 4-8 p.m. Remembrances may be made in Dick’s honor to the James L McKeown Boys & Girls Club of Woburn, Charles Gardner Lane, Woburn, MA 01801 or to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society 9 Erie Dr., Ste. 101, Natick, MA 01760.

Guestbook

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  1. I’m sorry to hear of the loss of your father. It sounds like he had a wonderful life with lots of friends and enjoying his family.
    Donna Good (Sandvik)

  2. Dear Siobhan,
    Please accept my heartfelt condolences at this most difficult time and I ask that you please pass these sentiments on to your family and your father’s friends. I wish I had the opportunity to have known your father as I can see how his personality and strength must have passed into you and in doing so he lives on in you and those who loved him.

    With Sincere Sympathy,
    Saurabh Sachdeva

  3. What a wonderful ‘renaissance’ man. Woburn is a better place because of Dick Curran and his family. What a lovely legacy.

    Heather Pillar, Tom, Eliane and Emeline Pado

  4. What a wonderful ‘renaissance’ man. Woburn is a better place because of Dick Curran and his family. What a lovely legacy.

  5. A wonderful, kind man, friend to all.Catsy and John so sorry for your loss. So happy he will be greeted by Joan and your great mom and Dad. My prayers always. Nancy

  6. What a class act. A true gentlemen. Thank you for always being so nice to me Mr. Curran.
    Jayne Lee

  7. Dear John, all of us at the Billerica COA wish to convey our deepest sympathy on the loss of your beloved father. These are very difficult times for you and your family but may your father’s determination serve as a beacon of light to get each of you out of this dark period of sadness.
    Jean Patel Bushnell and the Staff/Volunteer Team

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